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Resilient and Ready: Perspective of the PWH Leadership Summit by Kaycee Kalpin

07/13/2018 1:50 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)
We attended. We took notes. We networked.

But, now a month after the conclusion of the PWH Leadership Summit, what takeaways can we honestly say have fundamentally changed our perspectives on our profession and our purpose?

For me – without question – it was Valorie Burton’s Resilient and Ready keynote. It’s no wonder that she’s written 11 books and is an acclaimed life coach; she just gets it. I am finding myself referencing several of her key messages in my day-to-day. Here are a few:

1)      Be resilient in the face of adversity – I’m a 30-something mother of young children and a healthcare marketing leader. Some of you might relate with the prejudice experienced toward working moms: too young; too inexperienced to be a boss; spread too thin; should be home with kids. Newsflash: I’m over it and I’m owning it. Balancing the many moving parts of my life is challenging, but so rewarding. According to Valorie, resilient people have a level of physiological capital and mental toughness that enable us to perform and lead better under stress. Instead of apologizing for it, I’m going to embrace this stage of life moving forward. After all, I’m better because of it.


2)      Taking risks is healthy – Fear, Valorie mentioned, is inevitable. But it shouldn’t be a stop sign. Since PWH Summit I’ve faced professional and personal decisions that all have an easy, or safe, option. It’s comfortable to take the path of least resistance as an individual, as a manager and as a leader. I’m now challenging myself to take more risks – try new ways of doing things. I’m finding routine and mundane cadences in my life that are not productive and replacing them with different approaches. Some may fail; some may flourish. Regardless of the outcome, I’ll have lessons to share with my colleagues along the way.

3)      Failures are your best learning tools – This message has changed my management style in such a positive way. It reminds me of the old saying “one man’s trash is another man’s treasure”. What may have been, at one point in my career, a misstep or perceived failure could be leveraged as a teachable moment for others. This is particularly true for my fellow millennials, in my opinion, that are drawn to storytelling that is relatable and meets them where they are. I’ve challenged myself to take this approach more often and am encouraging my team to do the same.
 
4)      Compartmentalize – Valorie nailed it. How much time do we spend focusing on aspects of our life or job that are out of our control? Working for a company with a defined mission, vision, values and goals means relinquishing some control. There will absolutely be aspects of our contribution that we can control and change; but there will inherently be aspects we cannot. I’m working on time management. Spending as much time as possible where I believe I can make the biggest impact. Compartmentalizing what’s in and out of my control. So far – it’s working great. And it’s refreshing.

What messages did you bring back that are making appearances in your day-to-day? I’d enjoy hearing your perspective; share below in the comments section.

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